South West London

A Guide to Living in South West London

There’s been a huge resurgence in South West London’s property scene of late, namely because this is an area of the capital with so much potential. The term ‘something for everyone’ is thrown around wildly, but in South West London’s case it’s actually justified. This is an area that comes in all forms and guises, shapes and sizes. And that’s exactly why property developers have made it something of a playground.

The Nine Elms regeneration project

The award for ‘most dramatic transformation’ goes to Nine Elms, a long slither of Thames riverfront between Lambeth Bridge and Chelsea Bridge. Here, glossy new-build apartment blocks are ten-a-penny, but it’s not just the residential scene that’s getting a facelift.  New offices, infrastructure, transport and entertainment hubs – among many other initiatives – are part of this £15 billion renovation scheme.

Brixton

Just south of the sparkling skyscrapers of SW8, urban cool can be found in edgy Brixton and Clapham. The lively pubs, bars and music venues (don’t miss Hootananny) in these parts promise a night out to remember, and there’s plenty in the way of kitsch brunch spots to help with that sore head the next day. Area newcomers should head to Brixton Village and Brixton Market, where the community spirit is infectious, and the round-ups include taste-tingling street food and local performers. Next door Stockwell is quieter but not without its charms. Dubbed ‘Little Portugal’, it’s home to a large Portuguese population, and its cafés and eateries serve up all kinds of national delicacies.

Affluent South West London

Northern postcodes like SW1, SW3 and SW7 appeal to those who like to live la dolce vita. Ticking off upmarket neighbourhoods such as Westminster, Belgravia, Chelsea and South Kensington, it’s where house prices are in the millions and the residential scenery is quintessential London. Think timeless Victorian townhouses, black wrought-iron gates and immaculate garden squares.

Nappy Valley

Further south, you’ll find greener boroughs like Wandsworth and Wimbledon – both of which regularly top polls of London’s best places to live. Wandsworth is well-known as ‘Nappy Valley’, such is the draw for families here. Wandsworth Common and King George’s park are prime picnic and playing territory, and the local schools have a decent reputation. That said, the area’s younger population is also rising steadily – a result of the brand-new luxury waterfront apartments, an easy commute to Victoria and Waterloo, and a fabulous wining and dining scene. This savvy lot also knows it’s a lot cheaper to live in Wandsworth than it is to live in Fulham – just across the river.

Putney

East of Wandsworth lies pretty Putney, a delightful mix of riverside restaurants and cafés, swathes of green and period properties. The area’s many sporting clubs (tennis, golf, rowing – it’s all present and correct) will suit outdoorsy types, while nearby Roehampton University pulls in the students. As such, the waterfront bars come alive after dark.

Find out more – read reviews from the HomeViews community by clicking on the South West London developments below. Do you live in a residential development in South West London? Click here to leave your review.

4.42
Average Location Score

Excellent

52%

Very Good

37%

Average

10%

Disappointing

1%

Very Poor

1%

Top Rated Developments in South West London

Reviews in South West London

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Royal Quarter Kingston, great town living

The amenities in Kingston are second to none, with every shop and restaurant imaginable on your doorstep.
The downside of the development is the proximity to the one way system which can be noisy, and the railway line which often has maintenance work.
Property management is generally good but does differ between the blocks in the development, with shared ownership properties likely to get a poorer service.

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Royal Quarter is an ideal place to live for anyone needing close access to the town centre, railway station and other local amenities such as the gym, supermarkets, etc. It is not always the quietest place but is more sheltered than it looks. In summary, ideal for a younger tenant or resident, ideally located for Kingston Town centre.

4
Facilities
5
Design
5
Location
4
Value
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Great

Verified Resident

Im not sure why this development is being compared to other nearby developments. The housing association properties are certainly to a better standard than the properties at embassy gardens, and unlike Riverlight Quay or Embassy Gardens the private properties at Battersea Exchange are cheaper, offer better views, (there are no tall blocks on site affecting views unlike embassy gardens) and are right next to Battersea park and Queenstown road stations, at the other two sites you will need a bus to access the rail stations or face a long walk. Presently I can walk out of my apartment and find myself in Victoria in less than 10 minutes, perfect for commuting. Battersea park is 2 mins around the corner perfect for picnics and days out, and Sloane square and clapham junction are literally minutes away by bus and train. A sainsburys local is due to open on site soon but best of all my daughter literally steps out of our apartment and straight into St Mary’s school, which is part of the development and recently opened up a beautiful advent community event linking major nine elms sites and offered free festivities.
There is a largish tesco nearby and a large waitrose 10-15 minute walk away. There is also a very large sainsburys in nine elms which is not far away from the abs of course the wonderful circus west village based at Battersea power station, with a host of restaurants shops and always has events on such as Christmas markets festivals and other activities, not to mention a pier served by thames clippers.
The complex itself is tastefully done with careful restoration work to railway arches whilst keeping their original character. The only unfortunate thing is if you live higher up you can see graffiti on the railway which has nothing to do with the development but is an eyesore nonetheless as are the imposing 1960s square blocks of the Doddington Estate.
You may also find a wonderful array of great eateries and restaurants on the Battersea park road, such as captain Correllis a shabby but extremely authentic Italian restaurant and Cafe, boqueria {Spanish tapas), San Gennaro pizzeria, or highly rated takeaways such as Pho Ta Vietnamese, independent coffee shops serving great food, a pizza place and a fish and chip shop for and a fantastically refurbished gastro pub basically on site, (The Mason’s Arms)
Noise from the railways are non existent with the doors closed and you can hardly hear them with the doors open as the lines are so close to the station the trains are slowed right down. Noise from the football pitches are minimal and there is free parking located 3 minutes walk away on stewarts road or all day after 12pm opposite the dogs home.

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Housing association flats are made to a different and lesser standard to private flats and are much smaller, however they are cheaper to rent at about £265 a week, however this is very high compared to other housing association properties around London. Having visited a few apartments I’ve noticed they are are often awkwardly shaped with no thought to where television or sofas are going to be placed, however saying that the facilities provided are good, balcony decking, doors and windows, and blinds, ample kitchen cupboard space, underfloor heating, lino instead of carpet which is easier to clean than carpet heated towel rail, bathroom mirror and small utility cupboard to fit in a washer dryer . Of course, fittings such as oven fridge breakfast bar and full height style tiles were not included and bathrooms are decked in plain white tile. There has also been issues of flooding behind the walls in several properties and the apartments get very hot during the summer due to the triple glazing, however the heating rarely gets put on during the winter saving money.
Residents are generally good but sometimes litter has been left in the lift and as HA tenants can’t use concierge facilities parcels are often left in the communal entry area. Sometimes people taking bins out has resulted in smelly liquid being left in the lift and trailing out the door however this is not often. Community is good unlike comments made by private tenants above most residents have got to know each other especially those with children attending st mary’s school downstairs. Balconies also have windows on them which is a good safety feature for those with children and all windows in apartments are lockable. Paragon housing association which manages the flats are hit and miss but often good and problems can also be reported to savills as they still manage the block
A colorful light tribute to the tram lines which once adorned the grounds has been installed in the arch going out onto Queenstown road. Bike store is good.
Children’s play areas are minimal however, a strange raised grass v verge and the area outside of it is touted as a play space however it is also an unofficial road and takeaway motorbikes zoom up and down the development all times of the day and night delivering food which is dangerous. The communal gardens aren’t maintained well when a tree was felled due to strong wings it wasn’t replaced and the space where it once was looks sparce in its absence. Some grasses flowers and bushes would look beautiful but instead there is just plain soil with a scattering of plant life.
The design outside mercer house also turns it into a wind tunnel even in light winds and this should have been taken into account during the design stage, the small trees planted suffer greatly during the winds, it would have been better to plant bigger trees with more bush as aesthetically they look better and can stand the wind more. The other trees on site seem to be a bit bare, and have not taken to their new homes.

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Nothing as I’ve always known the local area since a child

5
Facilities
3
Design
4
Location
4
Value
4
Management
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Nightmare at Battersea

Verified Resident

The area is constantly changing, there are some real nice developments being built. Battersea Exchange is not one of them. The street pollution is a growing problem mostly rubbish left by non residents. The council does not seem to care.

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The prices at this development may be cheaper than other developments in the area but that is for a good reason. There are many construction related design issues, the building standards are lower here.

Please share one thing (or more) which you wish you had known before you moved in:

No street parking permits offered by the council for the residents of this building, except social housing residents which make up 1/3 of the units. The football pitches near the buildings are always full, they make a lot of noise even later in the evening. The flats were not designed to allow central AC system to be put in place and they do not allow any changes to the outside of the flat, even for HVAC unit.

How has the building management responded to any problems or issues you have raised:

The building management is a nightmare. The concierge is trying to cope with Amazon packages for 290 units as well as constantly faulty communal utilities. They get very little support from Savills or Taylor Wimpey. The development did not have central hot water for days this week and that is not the 4 times this year.. There is blame game between Taylor Wimpey and the building manager, Savills.

2
Facilities
2
Design
4
Location
2
Value
1
Management
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Christopher Rees-Williams Property Pro

A fantastic new development combining modern architecture and listed heritage

Old York Road is a perfect slice of London. Ram Quarter has connected Old York Road to the High Street and has reopened the Wandle for all residents and visitors.

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Wandsworth has always been a desirable location, and the addition of the now completed Ram Quarter development by Greenland has further enhanced the area, incorporating an exciting new retail and residential destination.

The architect of Ram Quarter, EPR Architects, has seamlessly brought together modern architecture and the development’s listed heritage past; Coopers’ Lofts sits comfortably amongst the new-build apartments. Many apartments offer private roof gardens and all residents benefit from a 24 hour concierge.

Although a residential-led development, the recent commercial openings have really come into their own. Backyard Cinema is a huge draw and it’s very exciting that Sambrook’s Brewery will open at Ram Quarter within the next few months.

Transport connections are good – I can reach Ram Quarter from my office in Oxford Circus within 25 minutes. Also on-site parking is available for purchase.

It is always fantastic to see developments realise their potential and Ram Quarter is certainly demonstrating that large mixed-use developments, designed well, with a carefully curated retail and leisure offering, really make a new-build apartment a home.

Please disclose any commercial relationship to this development or developer:

Acting as development consultant and sales agent

5
Facilities
5
Design
5
Location
5
Value
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